Mastery Flight Training, Inc.  Beech Weekly Accident Update archives

 

November 2004 Reports

 

Official information from FAA and NTSB sources (unless otherwise noted).  Editorial comments (contained in parentheses), year-to-date summary and closing comments are those of the author.  All information is preliminary and subject to change.  Comments on preliminary topics are meant solely to enhance flying safety.  Please use these reports to help you more accurately evaluate the potential risks when you make your own decisions about how and when to fly.  Please accept my sincere personal condolences if anyone you know was in a mishap. I welcome your comments, suggestions and criticisms.  Fly safe, and have fun!

 

Copyright 2004 Mastery Flight Training, Inc.  All Rights Reserved

 

 

11/02/04 Report

 

NEW REPORTS THIS WEEK

 

10/27 1558Z (1158 local):  Departing IFR into weather of 300 broken, 3700 broken, 4600 overcast, visibility 1.5 miles and calm winds, a Be60 “crashed shortly after departure” at Asheville, North Carolina.  Four aboard the Duke died and the airplane was “destroyed.”  The flight was bound for Greensboro, North Carolina, and the officially reported last radio contact was when the Duke was cleared for takeoff.  N611JC was a 1978 B60 registered since March 2003 to an individual in Miami, Florida.

 

(“Takeoff/Unknown”; “Fatal”; “Aircraft destroyed”; “IMC”—Local press reports:Moments before the crash, the pilot contacted the control tower to report mechanical problems….James Stafford of Etowah was working a nearby construction job when he saw the small plane overhead. It looked like it was in trouble, he said.  ‘The engines sounded like they were out of gas, kind of,’ Stafford said.  ‘When it circled up here, it sounded like it was trying to find the runway.’  Then, he turned on a police scanner in his truck and heard the pilot call ‘mayday.’ Next, he heard an explosion that sounded like dynamite.”  The Asheville area is surrounded by steeply rising terrain, and is well known for extensive fogginess that may have played a part in the pilot’s attempt to return to the airport)

 

10/28 1610Z (1210 local):  A Be58 landed gear up at Panama City, Florida.  The solo pilot reports no injuries and damage is “unknown.”  Weather: “clear and seven” with a three knot, variable wind.  N930BD is a 1973 Model 58, “sale reported” from a Bahamian address and with registration “status in question” according to the current FAA database.

 

(“Gear up landing”)

 

10/29 0140Z (2040 local 10/28/04):  During a night, IFR flight from Winner, South Dakota to Anderson, Indiana, a Be36 crashed in unreported weather conditions near Downing, Missouri.  Three died in the crash and the Bonanza was “destroyed.”  N55448 was a 1990 A36 registered since 1990 to a corporation in Anderson, Indiana.

 

(“Crash/unknown”; “Fatal”; “Aircraft destroyed”; “Night”—severe thunderstorms and tornadoes were reported in the area of the crash at the approximate time of impact). 

 

 

11/11/04 Report

 

NEW REPORTS THIS WEEK

 

10/27 1558Z (1158 local):  Departing IFR into weather of 300 broken, 3700 broken, 4600 overcast, visibility 1.5 miles and calm winds, a Be60 “crashed shortly after departure” at Asheville, North Carolina.  Four aboard the Duke died and the airplane was “destroyed.”  The flight was bound for Greensboro, North Carolina, and the officially reported last radio contact was when the Duke was cleared for takeoff.  N611JC was a 1978 B60 registered since March 2003 to an individual in Miami, Florida.

 

(“Takeoff/Unknown”; “Fatal”; “Aircraft destroyed”; “IMC”—Local press reports:Moments before the crash, the pilot contacted the control tower to report mechanical problems….James Stafford of Etowah was working a nearby construction job when he saw the small plane overhead. It looked like it was in trouble, he said.  ‘The engines sounded like they were out of gas, kind of,’ Stafford said.  ‘When it circled up here, it sounded like it was trying to find the runway.’  Then, he turned on a police scanner in his truck and heard the pilot call ‘mayday.’ Next, he heard an explosion that sounded like dynamite.”  The Asheville area is surrounded by steeply rising terrain, and is well known for extensive fogginess that may have played a part in the pilot’s attempt to return to the airport)

 

10/28 1610Z (1210 local):  A Be58 landed gear up at Panama City, Florida.  The solo pilot reports no injuries and damage is “unknown.”  Weather: “clear and seven” with a three knot, variable wind.  N930BD is a 1973 Model 58, “sale reported” from a Bahamian address and with registration “status in question” according to the current FAA database.

 

(“Gear up landing”)

 

10/29 0140Z (2040 local 10/28/04):  During a night, IFR flight from Winner, South Dakota to Anderson, Indiana, a Be36 crashed in unreported weather conditions near Downing, Missouri.  Three died in the crash and the Bonanza was “destroyed.”  N55448 was a 1990 A36 registered since 1990 to a corporation in Anderson, Indiana.

 

(“Crash/unknown”; “Fatal”; “Aircraft destroyed”; “Night”—severe thunderstorms and tornadoes were reported in the area of the crash at the approximate time of impact). 

 

 

 

NEW NTSB PRELIMINARY REPORTS:  All previously reported in the Weekly Accident Update, and subject to update per NTSB findings. 

 

**10/17 fatal Twin Bonanza crash at Hartwood, Virginia.  A case study in predeparture decision-making.  http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20041030X01727&key=1 **

 

**10/19 double-fatality B55 flat spin into downtown Atlanta, Georgia.  Change “Crash/Unknown” to “Loss of control—Thunderstorm penetration” and “IMC”. http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20041101X01728&key=1 **

 

**10/21 double-fatality F35 crash into terrain near Chester, Arkansas.  Change “Crash/unknown” to “Controlled flight into terrain-- Attempted low-altitude visual flight in low IMC.”  http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20041027X01706&key=1 **

 

**10/23 fatal F33A collision with terrain during an IFR takeoff into low IMC in areas of rising terrain.  Change “Departure/Unknown” to “Controlled flight into terrain-- Collision with rising terrain during IFR takeoff in low IMC”.  http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20041029X01725&key=1 **

 

 

11/18/04 Report

 

NEW REPORTS THIS WEEK

 

11/13 (time not reported):  Two died when a Be36 en route VFR from El Monte, California to Lake Havasu City, Arizona crashed “under unknown circumstances” eight miles west of the Lake Havasu airport.  The airplane has “substantial” damage; weather conditions were “not reported.”  N6111C is a 1981 A36 registered since 2000 to an individual in South El Monte, California.

 

(“Crash/Unknown”; “Fatal”; “Aircraft destroyed”)

 

11/17 0002Z (1602 local):  A Be35’s landing gear collapsed on landing at Laverne, California.  The solo pilot, on a local flight, was unhurt despite “substantial” damage.  Weather: “VFR.”  N5710V is a 1966 V35 recently (April 2004) registered to an individual in Glendora, California.

 

(“Gear collapse on landing”; “Substantial damage”; “Recent registration”)

 

11/17 1630Z (0830 local):  A Be19 was being hand-propped for “maintenance” and “not intended for flight” when its “engine started and (it) rammed into the hangar,” resulting in “substantial” damage.  No one was hurt in the incident in Corona, California.  Weather was VMC.  N5239M is a 1978 B19 registered since 1999 to an individual in Santa Barbara, California.

 

(“Impact with object/control lost while being hand-propped”; “Substantial damage”—the current issue of EAA’s Sport Pilot magazine contains a good article on hand-propping safety)

 

NEW NTSB PRELIMINARY REPORTS:  All previously reported in the Weekly Accident Update, and subject to update per NTSB findings. 

 

**There are no newly posted piston Beech NTSB reports this week**

 

 

11/24/04 Report

 

NEW REPORTS THIS WEEK

 

11/20 0547Z (2357 local 11/19/04):  A Be36 “lost (its) engine while vectoring for the ILS” at Huntsville, Alabama.  The pilot “declared an emergency” but other “circumstances are unknown.”  The pilot reports no injury and three passengers have “minor” injuries; airplane damage is “unknown.”  Weather: 100 broken, 600 broken, 1200 overcast, winds calm, temperature/dew point both 13C contributing to 1.5 miles visibility in light drizzle.  N38047 is/was a 1980 A36TC registered since 2001 to a corporation based in Newark, Delaware.

 

(“Engine failure on approach”; “IMC”; “Night”)  

 

 

NEW NTSB PRELIMINARY REPORTS:  All previously reported in the Weekly Accident Update, and subject to update per NTSB findings. 

 

**10/15 C24R off-airport landing at Hyannis, Massachusetts.  Change “Takeoff/Unknown” to “Engine failure in flight—engine fire; improper maintenance” in a flight in IMC.  http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20041118X01834&key=1 **

 

**10/25 fatal P35 impact at Aiken, South Carolina.  Change “Landing/Unknown” to “Controlled flight into Terrain-- Descent into surface/object during approach” and add “IMC.”  http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20041101X01731&key=1 **

 

**11/13 double-fatality A36 crash near Havasu Lake, California.  Change “Crash/Unknown” to “Controlled flight into terrain-- Collision with rising terrain while VFR in areas of marginal VMC”.  http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20041122X01851&key=1 **

 

 

 

 

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